Anonymous said: How do you draw bodies ;-;

oeilvert:

let’s see i tend to make sections??? on my sketches when i draw bodies aahh how do i explain

image

like this omg my drawing process is very bad but that’s how i draw almost everything. i change the shape depending on the character i’m drawing

image

image

also when i’m doing the lines i change things haha u_u and that’s it….

please check my previous answered questions so you can find some helpful links and references. i have a reference tag in my insp blog as well!

hope this helps

theomeganerd:

Video Game History Through Controllers

by Javier Laspiur

rhamphotheca:

Reptile Robbery: Why Poachers Are Wiping Out Ontario’s Turtles
International pet collectors have devastated all eight turtle species in the Canadian province.
by John R. Platt
Ontario’s once plentiful turtles are rapidly disappearing as poachers grab the reptiles for sale on the international pet trade market.
Some turtle populations in the province have completely vanished over the past decade. “My turtles are gone,” Jacqueline Litzgus, a spotted turtle researcher, told the The Canadian Press last week.
Most of the turtles end up for sale in pet shops in Asia and Europe, even though international trade in many turtle species is illegal, said Eric Goode, founder and president of the Turtle Conservancy.
“I went to Tokyo in 2002 and did a survey looking for endangered turtles and other reptiles and animals,” he said. “I was shocked. North American turtles were in all the pet stores.”…
(read more: TakePart)
photograph by Kevin Stohlgren

rhamphotheca:

Reptile Robbery: Why Poachers Are Wiping Out Ontario’s Turtles

International pet collectors have devastated all eight turtle species in the Canadian province.

by John R. Platt

Ontario’s once plentiful turtles are rapidly disappearing as poachers grab the reptiles for sale on the international pet trade market.

Some turtle populations in the province have completely vanished over the past decade. “My turtles are gone,” Jacqueline Litzgus, a spotted turtle researcher, told the The Canadian Press last week.

Most of the turtles end up for sale in pet shops in Asia and Europe, even though international trade in many turtle species is illegal, said Eric Goode, founder and president of the Turtle Conservancy.

“I went to Tokyo in 2002 and did a survey looking for endangered turtles and other reptiles and animals,” he said. “I was shocked. North American turtles were in all the pet stores.”…

(read more: TakePart)

photograph by Kevin Stohlgren

Batwoman Bishoujo Statue by Kotobukiya

(via whittingtonb)

diaemyung:

Have a great day

(via astrejlau)

sunhawk:

maiji:

OK to whomever submitted this … “I don’t want to sound mean” - but you do sound mean, and you are being mean.
I do get the sense that you are wanting to set some sort of realistic expectations for people who think they can make a lot of money at artist alleys. I also get and agree with the sense of frustration for people who complain about sales/how “good” an artist alley is when their work is not the most appropriate for the audience of a particular event.
But your phrasing comes off as elitist, and worst of all, discouraging to the people who have the most to benefit from the artist alley experience.
We all had to start from somewhere. Artist alley is great especially for amateurs. You get to interact in a (more often than not) welcoming, positive environment with other people who love doing the same things you love doing, in the physical world! You get to see in-person consumer reaction to your work! You get to meet and make friends with other artists who can support you as you all grow! You get to learn! This isn’t a professional art gallery for the established or something. I can’t think of many better opportunities than an artist alley for a young artist.
What’s more, people have a hard enough time building self-confidence in their own work. You hear this over and over and you can see it over and over in social media everywhere - artists are their own worst critic. The attitude given in the message above is one of the most disheartening things, another voice in the back of your head wondering if you will ever be good enough.
What is your definition of ready? How do you know when you’re ready? It isn’t a black and white answer. For god’s sake, you will never know if you are good enough. You will always have self-doubt. This happens to professionals who’ve been doing it for decades too.
I have events that I do well at and events I don’t. There are artists whose work sell better than mine, and artists who don’t, and it’s not always immediately obvious who they are based on the subject matter or quality of their work.
Sales happen or don’t happen for lots of reasons - the perception of your art skill is certainly a factor you want to consider. But it is also one of many factors.
So yes, be realistic with your expectations, but at the same time, don’t forget: You will NEVER know if you’re ready for something until you do it.
Also, this is a whole other rant, but people really need to stop selling/buying the myth that original work/OCs don’t sell. I know quite a few artists who sell mostly or exclusively work of original characters (including those with no story behind it). Heck, I probably count as one of them.
Sure, depending on the event, most people may be looking for fanart, and fanart definitely has higher visibility and accessibility to most of the audience. Yes, if you want immediate, short term return, fanart is an easier route to go.
What people for some bizarre reason don’t seem to understand is that when you create and sell original work, you’re building an audience for your own art independent of someone else’s established creation. Building an audience for original work takes longer, so you need to commit more time to it - but it is how you get beyond simply drawing fanart forever and being at the whim of whatever next new thing hits the street. (Also it’s probably a much more acceptable way to build a sustainable art career. :p)
I have a whole other long post in me about this, but I’ll save it for another day. I don’t rant often, so not sure if I will regret posting this later, but this is something that bothers me a great deal. Anyways, had to get this out.

Yeah I’m not sure what the point was of that “secret” other than “you’re not very good now so don’t even bother to try to get better” - gee thanks, that sounds SO productive and helpful.  It’s not the end of the world if you don’t sell a single thing from your table (and it almost never happens, you always sell at least ONE thing) and the amount of direct feedback from the art-buying public is PRICELESS.  LEARNING IS A FORM OF SUCCESS NEVER FORGET.

sunhawk:

maiji:

OK to whomever submitted this … “I don’t want to sound mean” - but you do sound mean, and you are being mean.

I do get the sense that you are wanting to set some sort of realistic expectations for people who think they can make a lot of money at artist alleys. I also get and agree with the sense of frustration for people who complain about sales/how “good” an artist alley is when their work is not the most appropriate for the audience of a particular event.

But your phrasing comes off as elitist, and worst of all, discouraging to the people who have the most to benefit from the artist alley experience.

We all had to start from somewhere. Artist alley is great especially for amateurs. You get to interact in a (more often than not) welcoming, positive environment with other people who love doing the same things you love doing, in the physical world! You get to see in-person consumer reaction to your work! You get to meet and make friends with other artists who can support you as you all grow! You get to learn! This isn’t a professional art gallery for the established or something. I can’t think of many better opportunities than an artist alley for a young artist.

What’s more, people have a hard enough time building self-confidence in their own work. You hear this over and over and you can see it over and over in social media everywhere - artists are their own worst critic. The attitude given in the message above is one of the most disheartening things, another voice in the back of your head wondering if you will ever be good enough.

What is your definition of ready? How do you know when you’re ready? It isn’t a black and white answer. For god’s sake, you will never know if you are good enough. You will always have self-doubt. This happens to professionals who’ve been doing it for decades too.

I have events that I do well at and events I don’t. There are artists whose work sell better than mine, and artists who don’t, and it’s not always immediately obvious who they are based on the subject matter or quality of their work.

Sales happen or don’t happen for lots of reasons - the perception of your art skill is certainly a factor you want to consider. But it is also one of many factors.

So yes, be realistic with your expectations, but at the same time, don’t forget: You will NEVER know if you’re ready for something until you do it.

Also, this is a whole other rant, but people really need to stop selling/buying the myth that original work/OCs don’t sell. I know quite a few artists who sell mostly or exclusively work of original characters (including those with no story behind it). Heck, I probably count as one of them.

Sure, depending on the event, most people may be looking for fanart, and fanart definitely has higher visibility and accessibility to most of the audience. Yes, if you want immediate, short term return, fanart is an easier route to go.

What people for some bizarre reason don’t seem to understand is that when you create and sell original work, you’re building an audience for your own art independent of someone else’s established creation. Building an audience for original work takes longer, so you need to commit more time to it - but it is how you get beyond simply drawing fanart forever and being at the whim of whatever next new thing hits the street. (Also it’s probably a much more acceptable way to build a sustainable art career. :p)

I have a whole other long post in me about this, but I’ll save it for another day. I don’t rant often, so not sure if I will regret posting this later, but this is something that bothers me a great deal. Anyways, had to get this out.

Yeah I’m not sure what the point was of that “secret” other than “you’re not very good now so don’t even bother to try to get better” - gee thanks, that sounds SO productive and helpful.  It’s not the end of the world if you don’t sell a single thing from your table (and it almost never happens, you always sell at least ONE thing) and the amount of direct feedback from the art-buying public is PRICELESS.  LEARNING IS A FORM OF SUCCESS NEVER FORGET.

it8bit:

"Atari: Game Over" Trailer

It’s here!! The official trailer for upcoming documentary about the ill-fated Atari E.T. cartridges was released today at San Diego Comic Con.

Coming this fall to Xbox.

via: Xbox

snow-p:

snowp.storenvy.com 

Hiya! So I set up a Storenvy cuz I have so much leftovers from past conventions just lying there… and not really able to go to cons regularly nowadays… 

I do believe there are stuff I’ve never posted online anywhere before… and half the store is on sale cuz stuff are old lol 

Aaannd did I mention store-wide buy 2 get 1 free??

Please check it out!!!!

And don’t hesitate to contact me there or here if you have any questions or concerns!

If anyone needs more prints - especially Fire Emblem stuff!

it8bit:

Nintendo Pixel Design Concepts

Created by eivven

sunhawk:

skulldog:

stuffman:

image

People have written a lot of touchy-feely pieces on this subject but I thought I’d get right to the heart of the matter

Holy Shit Two Cakes. My new art mantra.

^ SAME

rhamphotheca:

Mysterious 500 Million-Year-Old Ocean Predators Could Be the Ancestors of Spiders
by Annalee Newitz
Anomalocarids are one of the oldest families of animals on Earth, and they looked like nightmarish sea scorpions. But a new fossil discovery actually contains traces of their brain structure — and amazingly, their half-billion-year-old brains look a lot like an arachnid’s.
Though some anomalocarids may have been as big as 7 feet long, these newly-discovered specimens are closer to the size of today’s arachnids. The critters you see fossilized below are about 8 cm long. Still, they look pretty insane — especially when you consider that their segmented heads are so similar to what we’d see in an arachnid today. A team of paleontologists led by Peiyun Cong found the three gorgeously-preserved anomalocarid fossils in Yunnan Province, and described them today in Nature…
(read more at io9)
Anomalocarid illustration by John Meszaros

rhamphotheca:

Mysterious 500 Million-Year-Old Ocean Predators Could Be the Ancestors of Spiders

by Annalee Newitz

Anomalocarids are one of the oldest families of animals on Earth, and they looked like nightmarish sea scorpions. But a new fossil discovery actually contains traces of their brain structure — and amazingly, their half-billion-year-old brains look a lot like an arachnid’s.

Though some anomalocarids may have been as big as 7 feet long, these newly-discovered specimens are closer to the size of today’s arachnids. The critters you see fossilized below are about 8 cm long. Still, they look pretty insane — especially when you consider that their segmented heads are so similar to what we’d see in an arachnid today. A team of paleontologists led by Peiyun Cong found the three gorgeously-preserved anomalocarid fossils in Yunnan Province, and described them today in Nature

(read more at io9)

Anomalocarid illustration by John Meszaros

jelee-:

i wanted to draw the old gaang but i didn’t know which outfits from which books to draw them in then i was like oh hang on

jelee-:

i wanted to draw the old gaang but i didn’t know which outfits from which books to draw them in then i was like oh hang on

(via snow-p)


Bayonetta II Earrings [☪]

Bayonetta II Earrings []

animals & video games & the occasional late night drawing

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