nrdc:

Choose Safe, Sustainable Seafood
Smaller fish that are lower on the food chain, herbivorous fish in particular, tend to be plentiful and better for your health because they contain less mercury. And they offer plenty of great options for grilling, whether squid, mackerel, catfish, sardines, or Barrimundi.
For recipes, check out NRDC’s Sustainable Seafood Guide – try the “Fish Tacos with Grilled Corn,” a mouthwatering South-of-the-Border take on grilling. This guide also provides questions to ask when purchasing any of the five most popular five in the United States, including shrimp, salmon, tilapia, pollock and canned tuna, as well as a shopping guide, a list of higher and lower mercury fish, and information about sustainable fishing.
If you can purchase seafood from a Marine Stewardship Council-certified fishery, do so; MSC certification is rigorous and not easily awarded. EcoFish and Wild Planet Foods are retailers that only sell sustainable seafood products, and can ship them directly to you if there isn’t a nearby store that sells the same product.
Where those options aren’t available, seek out fish caught locally in preference to those caught outside the United States. American seafood isn’t perfect, but the U.S. variety of a particular type of fish is generally better than its imported counterpart because this country has stricter fishing and farming standards than do other parts of the world.
Read more: The Omnivore’s Green Grill
Photo: Another Pint Please/Flickr

This needs so many more reblogs! Especially if you’re big on eating fish (I’m looking at you, sushi-lovers - myself included).
People take fish for granted so much, especially when it comes to food (I admit, I had no idea what an actual tuna looked like until a few years ago). It’s hard to believe that wild populations of fish are declining because it’s not something we can easily see firsthand. But surveys have been and are still being taken on wild populations and the decline in numbers is not just random chance. At the very least, consider swapping out some of the “worst offenders” in your diet with the more sustainable options, like catfish. I heard catfish is great for grilling!

nrdc:

Choose Safe, Sustainable Seafood

Smaller fish that are lower on the food chain, herbivorous fish in particular, tend to be plentiful and better for your health because they contain less mercury. And they offer plenty of great options for grilling, whether squid, mackerel, catfish, sardines, or Barrimundi.

For recipes, check out NRDC’s Sustainable Seafood Guide – try the “Fish Tacos with Grilled Corn,” a mouthwatering South-of-the-Border take on grilling. This guide also provides questions to ask when purchasing any of the five most popular five in the United States, including shrimp, salmon, tilapia, pollock and canned tuna, as well as a shopping guide, a list of higher and lower mercury fish, and information about sustainable fishing.

If you can purchase seafood from a Marine Stewardship Council-certified fishery, do so; MSC certification is rigorous and not easily awarded. EcoFish and Wild Planet Foods are retailers that only sell sustainable seafood products, and can ship them directly to you if there isn’t a nearby store that sells the same product.

Where those options aren’t available, seek out fish caught locally in preference to those caught outside the United States. American seafood isn’t perfect, but the U.S. variety of a particular type of fish is generally better than its imported counterpart because this country has stricter fishing and farming standards than do other parts of the world.

Read more: The Omnivore’s Green Grill

Photo: Another Pint Please/Flickr

This needs so many more reblogs! Especially if you’re big on eating fish (I’m looking at you, sushi-lovers - myself included).

People take fish for granted so much, especially when it comes to food (I admit, I had no idea what an actual tuna looked like until a few years ago). It’s hard to believe that wild populations of fish are declining because it’s not something we can easily see firsthand. But surveys have been and are still being taken on wild populations and the decline in numbers is not just random chance. At the very least, consider swapping out some of the “worst offenders” in your diet with the more sustainable options, like catfish. I heard catfish is great for grilling!

(via rhamphotheca)

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